Kuchisake-onna (“Slit-Mouth Woman”) refers to both a story in Japanese mythology, as well as a modern version of the tale of a woman, mutilated by a jealous husband, and returned as a malicious spirit bent on committing the same acts done to her.
The legend is said to originate with a young woman who lived hundreds of years ago (some versions of the legend state the Heian Period which was about 794 to 1185) and was either the wife or concubine of a samurai. She is said to have been very beautiful but also very vain, and possibly cheating on her husband. The samurai, extremely jealous and feeling cuckolded, attacked her and slit her mouth from ear to ear, screaming “Who’ll think you’re beautiful now?!”The urban myth picks up from this point, stating that a woman roams around at night (especially during foggy evenings), with her face covered by a surgical mask, which would not be especially unusual, as people in Japan often wore masks in order to protect themselves from the flu or avoid infecting others when ill. When she encounters someone (primarily children, teenagers or college/high school students), she will shyly ask, “Am I pretty?” (“Watashi kirei?”). If the person answers yes, she will take off her mask and say, “How about now?” (“Kore demo?”). At this point, if the victim answers “No,” she will slay them or cut their mouths to resemble hers. Before she kills the victims that responded with no, she would take them to her old house where her husband cut her. If the victim tells her she is pretty a second time, she follows the victim home and slays them at the doorway to their residence, due to the fact that “kirei”, Japanese for ‘pretty,’ is a near homophone of “kiru”, the imperative form of “to cut”. In other versions of the myth if you reply yes after she removes the mask she will give you a large blood soaked ruby and walk away. Another version says that if you reply yes, she will take her scissors and cut your mouth from ear to ear, making you resemble her, but may let you live. On most versions of the myth she is impossible to escape, as she can either appear in front of you no matter which way you turn or can move at superhuman speeds and catch you

Kuchisake-onna (“Slit-Mouth Woman”) refers to both a story in Japanese mythology, as well as a modern version of the tale of a woman, mutilated by a jealous husband, and returned as a malicious spirit bent on committing the same acts done to her.

The legend is said to originate with a young woman who lived hundreds of years ago (some versions of the legend state the Heian Period which was about 794 to 1185) and was either the wife or concubine of a samurai. She is said to have been very beautiful but also very vain, and possibly cheating on her husband. The samurai, extremely jealous and feeling cuckolded, attacked her and slit her mouth from ear to ear, screaming “Who’ll think you’re beautiful now?!”

The urban myth picks up from this point, stating that a woman roams around at night (especially during foggy evenings), with her face covered by a surgical mask, which would not be especially unusual, as people in Japan often wore masks in order to protect themselves from the flu or avoid infecting others when ill. When she encounters someone (primarily children, teenagers or college/high school students), she will shyly ask, “Am I pretty?” (“Watashi kirei?”). If the person answers yes, she will take off her mask and say, “How about now?” (“Kore demo?”). At this point, if the victim answers “No,” she will slay them or cut their mouths to resemble hers. Before she kills the victims that responded with no, she would take them to her old house where her husband cut her. If the victim tells her she is pretty a second time, she follows the victim home and slays them at the doorway to their residence, due to the fact that “kirei”, Japanese for ‘pretty,’ is a near homophone of “kiru”, the imperative form of “to cut”. In other versions of the myth if you reply yes after she removes the mask she will give you a large blood soaked ruby and walk away. Another version says that if you reply yes, she will take her scissors and cut your mouth from ear to ear, making you resemble her, but may let you live. On most versions of the myth she is impossible to escape, as she can either appear in front of you no matter which way you turn or can move at superhuman speeds and catch you

Kuchisake-onna (“Slit-Mouth Woman”) refers to both a story in Japanese mythology, as well as a modern version of the tale of a woman, mutilated by a jealous husband, and returned as a malicious spirit bent on committing the same acts done to her.
The legend is said to originate with a young woman who lived hundreds of years ago (some versions of the legend state the Heian Period which was about 794 to 1185) and was either the wife or concubine of a samurai. She is said to have been very beautiful but also very vain, and possibly cheating on her husband. The samurai, extremely jealous and feeling cuckolded, attacked her and slit her mouth from ear to ear, screaming “Who’ll think you’re beautiful now?!”The urban myth picks up from this point, stating that a woman roams around at night (especially during foggy evenings), with her face covered by a surgical mask, which would not be especially unusual, as people in Japan often wore masks in order to protect themselves from the flu or avoid infecting others when ill. When she encounters someone (primarily children, teenagers or college/high school students), she will shyly ask, “Am I pretty?” (“Watashi kirei?”). If the person answers yes, she will take off her mask and say, “How about now?” (“Kore demo?”). At this point, if the victim answers “No,” she will slay them or cut their mouths to resemble hers. Before she kills the victims that responded with no, she would take them to her old house where her husband cut her. If the victim tells her she is pretty a second time, she follows the victim home and slays them at the doorway to their residence, due to the fact that “kirei”, Japanese for ‘pretty,’ is a near homophone of “kiru”, the imperative form of “to cut”. In other versions of the myth if you reply yes after she removes the mask she will give you a large blood soaked ruby and walk away. Another version says that if you reply yes, she will take her scissors and cut your mouth from ear to ear, making you resemble her, but may let you live. On most versions of the myth she is impossible to escape, as she can either appear in front of you no matter which way you turn or can move at superhuman speeds and catch you

Kuchisake-onna (“Slit-Mouth Woman”) refers to both a story in Japanese mythology, as well as a modern version of the tale of a woman, mutilated by a jealous husband, and returned as a malicious spirit bent on committing the same acts done to her.

The legend is said to originate with a young woman who lived hundreds of years ago (some versions of the legend state the Heian Period which was about 794 to 1185) and was either the wife or concubine of a samurai. She is said to have been very beautiful but also very vain, and possibly cheating on her husband. The samurai, extremely jealous and feeling cuckolded, attacked her and slit her mouth from ear to ear, screaming “Who’ll think you’re beautiful now?!”

The urban myth picks up from this point, stating that a woman roams around at night (especially during foggy evenings), with her face covered by a surgical mask, which would not be especially unusual, as people in Japan often wore masks in order to protect themselves from the flu or avoid infecting others when ill. When she encounters someone (primarily children, teenagers or college/high school students), she will shyly ask, “Am I pretty?” (“Watashi kirei?”). If the person answers yes, she will take off her mask and say, “How about now?” (“Kore demo?”). At this point, if the victim answers “No,” she will slay them or cut their mouths to resemble hers. Before she kills the victims that responded with no, she would take them to her old house where her husband cut her. If the victim tells her she is pretty a second time, she follows the victim home and slays them at the doorway to their residence, due to the fact that “kirei”, Japanese for ‘pretty,’ is a near homophone of “kiru”, the imperative form of “to cut”. In other versions of the myth if you reply yes after she removes the mask she will give you a large blood soaked ruby and walk away. Another version says that if you reply yes, she will take her scissors and cut your mouth from ear to ear, making you resemble her, but may let you live. On most versions of the myth she is impossible to escape, as she can either appear in front of you no matter which way you turn or can move at superhuman speeds and catch you

Posted 3 years ago & Filed under urban myth, kuchisake onna, japan, mutilation, beautiful, 66 notes

Notes:

  1. dis-honour-on-your-cow reblogged this from scarecrow-cameron
  2. scarecrow-cameron reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  3. aletterfromadeadgirl reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  4. spaceboar reblogged this from samtoenail
  5. samtoenail reblogged this from hakujichan
  6. hakujichan reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  7. brokenjoker1821 reblogged this from personsuit
  8. throhbackfridays reblogged this from heartfulpenguin
  9. spicylizard1 reblogged this from heartfulpenguin and added:
    hey is this what that korean comic that scared the shit out of everybody was about
  10. imooncake reblogged this from heartfulpenguin
  11. undersizedcynic reblogged this from heartfulpenguin
  12. heartfulpenguin reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  13. anadventureawaits reblogged this from frankenlomps
  14. lost-in-this-asylum reblogged this from lessthanthr3e and added:
    that is scary :/
  15. radicalreds reblogged this from frankenlomps and added:
    8U I’m wondering if that photo is from a movie based off the myth. If so, I wish to watch it.
  16. 0000947463 reblogged this from terrierfancy
  17. matori reblogged this from pixyled and added:
    This is one of my favorite Japanese ghost stories because it’s so weird and creepy. Both my makeup for the zombie walk I...
  18. pixyled reblogged this from frankenlomps and added:
    I always felt that I’d go into a long ass spheal about the subjectivity of beauty and society’s influence on our beleifs...
  19. terrierfancy reblogged this from frankenlomps and added:
    I read a comic about this myth recently… I actually like this one a lot.
  20. stick-chick reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy and added:
    like ‘Maybe’...‘so-so’ confuses/stuns...just long...
  21. wonderb0ner reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  22. p0l4r0id reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  23. bronnichiwa reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy and added:
    love urban legends...sometimes they’re creepy
  24. zdrastuiche reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  25. claudiahristova reblogged this from thoughtsinsecrecy
  26. thoughtsinsecrecy posted this

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